Posts Tagged ‘bonnet plume river’

Supreme Court to Hear Peel Case

Thursday, June 9th, 2016

Today, great news from CPAWS-Yukon:

“Months of waiting were put to an end today when the Supreme Court of Canada announced that our leave to appeal has been granted and the Peel Watershed case will be heard. The decision to hear our case in Canada’s highest court confirms that the future of the Peel is of national importance and that the November 2015 ruling of the Court of Appeal to roll back the clock on the land use planning process requires a second look.”

“Chris Rider, Executive Director of CPAWS Yukon, stated: “The Supreme Court of Canada’s decision to hear this case shows that it recognizes the value of the Peel Watershed. It is a treasure of international significance and it deserves protection. Beyond this, the final ruling will set a precedent for all future land use planning in the Yukon.”

“Thomas R. Berger will be representing our case to the Supreme Court, arguing that the Yukon Court of Appeal’s ruling was a mistake in the interpretation of the Final Agreements and that the original judgment from Justice Ron Veale should be reinstated. Justice Veale had decreed that the planning process be sent back to the final stage, which would have prevented the Yukon Government from adopting its closed-door plan – one that would open up 71% of the Peel to development. While the Court of Appeal partially upheld Veale’s judgment, it directed the process to re-start from 2010, providing an opening for the government to significantly reduce the level of protection from the 80% recommended by the Planning Commission.”

“The Supreme Court has yet to announce when the case will be heard, but it is likely to be in 2017.”

“In tandem with the announcement, today we are launching the Peel Pledge, a way for Yukoners and all Canadians to stand with First Nations and environmental groups and show their support for Peel protection.”

Take the Peel Pledge at www.protectpeel.ca.

See also the related story in the Yukon News

 

Take Action to Protect the Peel Watershed

For the latest news, action alerts and background information on the campaign to protect the Yukon’s 68,000 km2 Peel Watershed, visit: www.protectpeel.ca  Protectpeel is loaded with images, video and the stories behind the conservation campaign. Find out what you need to know, and what you can do, to support Canada’s largest proposed protected area.

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed in Whitehorse (online: www.yukonbooks.com ),  Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto).

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate all of the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip. Full of wonderful stories and information, it’s a must-have campfire companion.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book.

Peel Court Case Appeal to be Heard in August

Thursday, May 28th, 2015

Excerpt from Yukon News, by Jacqueline Ronson Wednesday May 27, 2015

“The Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation has joined the Tr’ondek Hwech’in, the First Nation of Nacho Nyak Dun and conservation groups in their legal battle with the Yukon government over the fate of the Peel watershed.

Yukon Supreme Court Justice Ron Veale struck down the Yukon government’s plan for the Peel after a court case last summer, ruling that it did not follow the process outlined in final agreements with First Nations.

The Yukon government is now appealing that decision. The case will be heard in August.

Vuntut Gwitchin joined the other First Nations as respondents in the appeal after a court hearing on Monday.”

“Our government has concerns regarding Yukon’s conduct during the later stages of the Peel planning process. We will continue to be vigilant to protect the integrity of our final and self-government agreements, including the regional land use planning provisions.”

“Such a ruling could inadvertently and unnecessarily thwart potential further legal action in the case, he said. The Yukon Land Use Planning Council also applied to act as an intervenor in the appeal.

Both the Yukon government and the respondents opposed the motion. The judge said he will make a decision on the issue in the coming weeks. The planning council could not be reached for comment by press time.”

For the full story:

http://www.yukon-news.com/news/vuntut-gwitchin-join-peel-appeal/

 

Take Action to Protect the Peel Watershed

For the latest news, action alerts and background information on the campaign to protect the Yukon’s 68,000 km2 Peel Watershed, visit: www.protectpeel.ca  Protectpeel is loaded with images, video and the stories behind the conservation campaign. Find out what you need to know, and what you can do, to support Canada’s largest proposed protected area.

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed in Whitehorse,  Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto), and on-line from www.yukonbooks.com.

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Early Days in Campaign to Protect Peel Watershed

Saturday, January 11th, 2014

When I walked into a small Vancouver courtroom in 1992, the odds did not look good for the Bonnet Plume River. Facing the judge, a battery of stern-faced lawyers was ready to make the case for the federal government and the company that wanted to develop a mine beside the river.

Our legal team consisted of one lawyer, Stewart Elgie, with the Sierra Legal Defence Fund. He told me that our group, the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, had a 50-50 chance of winning this particular fight. The case revolved around a 60-kilometre long winter road that had been bulldozed in to a large block of mining claims on the Bonnet Plume River. We had challenged the federal government’s environmental review of the project.

The Bonnet Plume was soon to be honoured as a Canadian Heritage River, thanks in large measure to the efforts of the Nacho Nyak Dun in their land claims negotiations, so at least some people out there thought this river was special. Yet the future of its clear waters and free-ranging caribou would be decided in a courtroom 2,500 kilometres away from this remote northern valley. Surely, I thought, we can’t delegate judgment on thousands of years of biological evolution and the destiny of a wild mountain river to a legal game of chance.

I had journeyed down many remote rivers before canoeing the Bonnet Plume in the summer of 1988, but I had never before experienced a watershed like this one. The aquamarine Bonnet Plume, with its sister rivers the Wind and Snake, carried in their crystal waters all the fascination of the Yukon wilderness. The space, infinite light, the escape from time itself, the never-ending gnarled and saw-toothed mountains, opened a new window on the meaning of wild.

Looking back now, I can see how that two-week journey changed my life. Growing up in a quiet town on the edge of the woods, I had always felt a kinship with nature, but here –on the Bonnet Plume — I realized that without help, extraordinary places like these would soon disappear, even in the Yukon.

In the early 1990s, when prospectors for Westmin Mining Corporation, exploring for copper, staked the flanks of the Bonnet Plume valley, they did so with the historic privileges afforded by the Yukon’s free-entry mining law, which grants powerful rights to those who first lay claim to the land. They knew they could knock down trees, bulldoze roads, dynamite, and utterly transform the land on their claims away from public scrutiny.

We wanted to take a closer look at Westmin’s operation and a generous local pilot donated the use of his two-seater Piper Cub. Soon I was up in the air, photographing the flattened spruce trees along the winter road leading to the airstrip and new mining camp. One corporation was on the verge of setting the direction for the Bonnet Plume valley. After seeing this giant scar on the landscape, I knew we could not accept surrendering this wild river to a money play in the southern penny market.  If this northern wilderness was to be diminished, where would we draw the next boundary for nature? It was time to confront the belief that mining exploration was exempt from environmental safeguards, and the only place we could do that was in the courts.

We lost that case on the weight of legal minutia, but we won an important point. The judge conceded the federal government was obliged to consider how mining could affect a Canadian Heritage River. Twelve years later, the airstrip, drill pads, and mining camp were long since abandoned — another legacy of the Yukon’s archaic frontier mining laws. The company found less copper than anticipated and metal prices dropped, so they packed up and left.  The company’s promised jobs and bright future for the Village of Mayo evaporated as quickly as the claims had been posted. For its part, the federal government realized its antiquated mining regulations, allowing for extensive exploration work without any environmental review, were no longer tenable. It dusted off long-awaited rules to improve the way mining companies carry out exploration work in the Yukon.

by Juri Peepre, excerpt from “Wild waters, sacred places” in Three Rivers: The Yukon’s Great Boreal Wilderness. Harbour Publishing, 2005.

 

Government Releases Peel Consultation Results

Wednesday, April 10th, 2013

The Yukon Government has released partial results from the extended public review of the proposed Peel watershed land use plan. This latest consultation wrapped up on February 25, after years of work by the Peel Watershed Land Use Planning Commission. After the widely supported recommended plan was set aside, the Yukon government released its own options for resource development and limited protection in the region.

All of the government’s land use options, developed behind closed doors, ignore the basic principles of conservation embodied in the Recommended Plan The results of the latest public review show continuing strong support for the original recommended plan as prepared by the Planning Commission—a proposal which would protect 80% of the Peel watershed.

 

To see the Yukon government’s media release and Yukon News coverage go to:

http://www.gov.yk.ca/news/13-077.html

http://www.yukon-news.com/news/32958/

To view the recommended plan and the Yukon government proposal:

http://www.peelconsultation.ca/

 

Take Action

For the latest news, action alerts and background information on the campaign to protect the Yukon’s 68,000 km2 Peel Watershed, visit: www.protectpeel.ca  Protectpeel is loaded with images, video and the stories behind the conservation campaign. Find out what you need to know, and what you can do, to support Canada’s largest proposed protected area.

 

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed in Whitehorse, Interior Books in Smithers), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto), and on-line from www.yukonbooks.com.

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip. The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

 

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $1.19 GST + Shipping = $32.00 CDN. For US orders, please add $3.00 for additional shipping costs, for a total of $35.00 US. For more information, contact jpeepreatyahoodotca, or post your comment or question in this blog.

Peel Watershed Plan Calls for 80% Protection

Tuesday, July 26th, 2011

The Peel Watershed Planning Commission released its much awaited final recommended land use plan today. In a bold response to earlier Yukon government criticism that the draft plan had too much protection, the Commission remained firm in recommending that 80% of the Peel watershed be protected, in two types of conservation areas. The plan calls for a large Special Management Area, a contiguous core protected area encompassing the entire Three Rivers region, including the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume watersheds – about 55% of the Peel watershed.

In the second type of conservation area, the Hart River is a proposed Wilderness Area, which provides for interim protection. Other watersheds, such as the Blackstone River on the western side of the Peel region, are within an Integrated Management Zone. Allowing for new industrial development in 20% of the watershed, and proposing interim protection in the Wilderness Areas, the Commission has shown a willingness to compromise. The Plan falls short of recommending protection for 100% of the watershed, as called for by First Nations and conservation groups, but remains a bold proposal of global importance.

This is a visionary plan for the Peel watershed, and, if accepted by the Yukon government, will result in one of the largest protected areas in North America. It deserves our support.

The last round of public consultations on the plan will be from mid-August until mid-September. We expect a Yukon government decision on the future of the watershed in late October, but the mandatory fall election may push that date.

To read the recommended land use plan, visit:

http://www.peel.planyukon.ca/downloads/FRLUP.html

Globe & Mail Features the Peel Watershed, July 23

Read Bruce Kirkby’s excellent article on why Canadians need to protect the Peel watershed wilderness:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/travel/destinations/travel-canada/how-long-will-canadas-final-frontier-stay-wild/article2106639/

Take Action

For the latest news, action alerts and background information on the campaign to protect the Yukon’s 68,000 km2 Peel Watershed, visit: www.protectpeel.ca Protectpeel is loaded with images, video and the stories behind the conservation campaign. Find out what you need to know, and what you can do, to support Canada’s largest proposed protected area.

Check out the Peel Watershed post on the National Geographic Global Action Atlas. Yes, the Peel conservation campaign has gone global!

http://www.actionatlas.org/content/id/pa33B5CA1D2654818C01

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from Yukon outdoor and bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed, Up North Adventures), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto), and on-line from www.yukonbooks.com.

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $1.19 GST + Shipping = $32.00 CDN. For more information, phone 250-688-1005, or post your comment or question in this blog.

Recommended Peel Watershed Plan Imminent

Saturday, July 23rd, 2011

Globe & Mail Features the Peel Watershed, July 23

Read Bruce Kirkby’s excellent article on why Canadians need to protect the Peel watershed wilderness:

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/travel/destinations/travel-canada/how-long-will-canadas-final-frontier-stay-wild/article2106639/

The Peel Planning Commission will release its final recommended land use plan on July 25. Will they stay true to their call for protecting 80% of this extraordinary constellation of wild rivers? The last round of public consultations on the plan will be from mid-August until mid-September. We expect a Yukon government decision on the future of the watershed in late October, but the mandatory fall election may push that date.

For the latest news, action alerts and background information on the campaign to protect the Yukon’s 68,000 km2 Peel Watershed, visit: www.protectpeel.ca Protectpeel is loaded with images, video and the stories behind the conservation campaign. Find out what you need to know, and what you can do, to support Canada’s largest proposed protected area.

The June issue of Canadian Geographic features the Snake River, one of the celebrated Three Rivers in the Peel Watershed. Find out about Chevron’s Crest iron ore deposit located on the lower Snake River, and see why conservation organizations are asking the corporation to relinquish its leases for the public good.

http://www.canadiangeographic.ca/magazine/jun11/snake_river_yukon.asp

Check out the Peel Watershed post on the National Geographic Global Action Atlas. Yes, the Peel conservation campaign has gone global!

http://www.actionatlas.org/content/id/pa33B5CA1D2654818C01

For more news on the Peel watershed, also visit: http://peelwatershed.blogspot.com/

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from Yukon outdoor and bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed, Up North Adventures), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto), and on-line from www.yukonbooks.com.

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $1.19 GST + Shipping = $32.00 CDN. For more information, phone 250-688-1005, or post your comment or question in this blog.

Yukon Government and First Nations Disagree on Protection of Peel Watershed

Thursday, February 24th, 2011

 

Four First Nations affected by the proposed land use plan for the Peel region are united in their goal to protect the watershed. Earlier this year, in a joint response to the recommended plan, the Chiefs said,

“We believe the entire region deserves the very highest level of protection. In our view, none of the land within the watershed should be open to industrial development.”

After years of conservation research and planning, followed by extensive public consultation showing widespread and strong support for watershed protection, the Yukon government now says that more work needs to be done to “develop a rationale” for protection.

Minister of Energy Mines and Resources Minister, Patrick Rouble, states that, “We believe a ban on surface access is not a workable scenario in a region with existing land interests and future development potential.”

Gill Cracknell, of the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, asked: “could it be that the government spent all that money and then didn’t listen to what people said?”

The Yukon’s Peel River Watershed is one of the largest constellations of wild mountain rivers in North America. Industrial development threatens to fragment this stunning landscape and harm its pristine boreal mountain ecosystem. The Peel Planning Commission recommends protecting 80% of the watershed, while First Nations have called for 100% protection. Recent polls show a large majority of Yukon residents support protection. 

For information on the campaign to protect the Peel Watershed:

www.protectpeel.ca

For the latest news visit:

http://www.yukon-news.com/news/21909/

The Yukon government response is at:

http://www.emr.gov.yk.ca/lands/regional_land_use_planning.html

Paddlers in the upper canyon of the Snake River. © Juri Peepre

The Wind, the Snake and the Bonnet Plume…

Saturday, February 12th, 2011

How did these rivers get their names? This excerpt from Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed, reveals some of the intriguing people behind the history (© Juri Peepre & Sarah Locke, 2008).

The Enigmatic Bonnetplume

“Somewhere in the Ogilvie Mountains, in an unmarked grave, lie the remains of Andrew Flett Bonnetplume, the Gwich’in man after whom the Bonnet Plume River is named. While never a chief, he is the only aboriginal person in Canada whose name graces a Canadian Heritage River. But trying to pin down how that came to be, and how a Gwich’in man gained the French-sounding name of Bonnetplume— can be a bit like grabbing at a leaf floating on fast water—it remains just out of reach.

Bonnetplume shows up regularly in the historical record, but the man remains an enigma. He had many different names— Scottish, French and Gwich’in. And even among his own people, noted for their epic journeys through challenging country, he was known as a wanderer. But there is one theme that crops up again and again with this man—if people are talking about gold in the Peel river country, Bonnetplume seems to be somewhere in the picture.

But first the names: In Gwich’in genealogy documents, Bonnet Plume’s mother is known as Ch’ihwhiingah or Chigweenjaa, meaning “throwing things out of the house” or “sweeping or throwing dust away.” She worked as a cleaning woman at several different Hudson Bay posts in the Mackenzie District, and her children possibly had different fathers. In that era, when aboriginal children were baptized they were often given the names of local HBC employees, so the first part of Bonnetplume’s name can be traced to Andrew Flett, an Orkney man who served at Fort McPherson from 1863 to 1875. In HBC account books from Flett’s time at the post, the Gwich’in man is referred to as Bonnet de Plume, and the source of that name remains elusive.”

Canyon on the Bonnet Plume. © Juri Peepre

“Jane Charlie, one of Bonnetplume’s granddaughters, says she has often wondered about her French name. She was told that Bonnetplume had been adopted by a French couple working for the Hudson’s Bay Company, but if a Frenchman named Bonnetplume worked for the HBC, the reference is buried deep in their well-kept records.

In 1893, the French count Edouard de Sainville, with the help of two Gwich’in guides, tracked a canoe up the Peel River to the mouth of the Bonnet Plume. Leaving their boat there, they walked about 40 kilometres up the tributary, crossed the mountains to the west and walked down the Wind River and back to their canoe.

De Sainville was following up on native reports of gold in the mountains. He found no precious metals, but he explored further up the Peel than any previous European and produced a map that was invaluable for the goldrushers who travelled that way five years later. On his map he did not name the Wind River, but the Snake is labelled the “Good Hope River,” and the Bonnet Plume River bears its current name.

De Sainville returned to France the following year, and published only a short account of his time in the North before dying a few years later. In it he describes his trip along the upper Peel as “one of the most perilous which I have ever undertaken.” One can only speculate whether the French count encountered a Gwich’in man prospecting for gold in the upper Peel River country, and decided to name the Bonnet Plume River after him.”

– Sarah Locke

For more information on the campaign to protect the Peel watershed, visit:  www.protectpeel.ca

Setting up camp on the Bonnet Plume. © Juri Peepre

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from Yukon outdoor and bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed, Up North Adventures), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto), and on-line from www.yukonbooks.com.

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $1.19 GST + Shipping = $32.00 CDN. For more information, phone 250-688-1005, or post your comment or question in this blog.

Yukon Government Tries to Discredit Peel Watershed Land Use Plan

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

 

The Yukon government has attempted to toss out the findings of the Peel Watershed Planning Commission, saying that the conservation oriented land use plan must be re-done to make more room for mining, roads and other industrial development.

In a widely acclaimed plan released in 2009 with strong public approval, the Commission recommended 80% protection for the watershed, including well known major tributaries such as the Wind, Snake, Bonnet Plume and Hart rivers. The affected First Nations have called for 100% protection of the watershed.

The Yukon government’s vague media statement released on the eve of the holiday season, asserted that “…proposing a high level of protection for such a large portion of the region… is inconsistent with the Yukon government view of the final [First Nations land claims] agreements.” This is a bogus argument, clearly not shared by the First Nations who have spent 5 years working on a land use plan for their traditional territories that reflects the spirit and intent of their land claims agreements.

While the current government is challenging permanent wilderness protection in the Peel watershed, it has committed to extending the staking moratorium for another year, while the land use plan is finalized. Earlier during the planning process more than 10,000 mining claims were staked in the watershed, compromising the ability to create protected areas. While the government is reluctant to protect nature, it does want to protect these existing mining claims.

The Yukon government and the First Nations must now work out a final response to the Planning Commission so that a land use plan can be approved in 2011.

To learn more and take action, visit: www.protectpeel.ca

For the latest news go to: http://peelwatershed.blogspot.com/

Yukon News: http://www.yukon-news.com/news/20996/

Campsite on upper Snake River at Reptile Creek.  ©  Juri Peepre.

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide

… is your complete source for planning a trip to the Yukon’s vast north-eastern wilderness – and learning more about the natural and cultural history of this inspiring landscape. Published in 2008 by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke, the book is available from Yukon outdoor and bookstores (Mac’s Fireweed, Up North Adventures), Mountain Equipment Co-op (Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto), and on-line from www.yukonbooks.com.

Wild Rivers is an essential companion to help you navigate the Three Rivers country (the Wind, Snake and Bonnet Plume), as well as the Peel, Hart, Ogilvie, Blackstone and Rat rivers. This well illustrated field reference will be a welcome gift for your friends or family who are thinking about a future northern canoeing or hiking trip.

The book features detailed river descriptions, maps, landscape and historic photos, tips on river travel in the Peel region, and engaging descriptions of the flora, fauna, geology, human history and conservation story. For more information, see About Our Book posted in the right margin.

Contact Us

To order the book directly from the authors, send a cheque or money order payable to Juri Peepre, 1575 Windermere Loop Road, Windermere, BC, V0B 2L2. Price: $24.95 + $1.19 GST + Shipping = $32.00 CDN. For more information, phone 250-688-1005, or post your comment or question in this blog. 

 

Great Reviews and Testimonials for “Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed”

Wednesday, October 8th, 2008

 

Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed: A Traveller’s Guide, published by Juri Peepre and Sarah Locke in June 2008, features 8 of the premiere navigable tributaries of the vast Peel watershed. This well-illustrated book describes the fascinating natural and cultural history of the region, and provides paddling trip details for the Wind, Snake, Bonnet Plume, Hart, Blackstone, Rat, Peel and Ogilvie rivers. Rounding out the book contents, readers will find poetry, essays and the ongoing Peel watershed conservation story.

For on-line orders, visit www.yukonbooks.com, or purchase from Mac’s Fireweed, Up North Adventures, or CPAWS-Yukon in Whitehorse.

Reviews & Testimonials

Canadian Wilderness, Fall 2008

“If you’ve been reading Canadian Wilderness for a few years, you’ll already know about the remote, beautiful Peel watershed. Author Juri Peepre led a CPAWS national tour in 2007 to raise awareness about the need to conserve this relatively unknown area threatened by industrial development. Peepre and co-author Sarah Locke have now produced a comprehensive guide to canoeing and hiking this spectacular area. This well-researched account of the geography, natural and human history of the watershed is recommended for those planning a trip, and for vicarious paddlers too. For more on the Peel watershed, read the Spring 2007 and Fall 2005 issues of Canadian Wilderness online at www.cpaws.org
  

The Thought Kitchen: blog.nau.com

 

“Your river notes were incredibly helpful. In fact, when we returned to Whitehorse we went straight to Mac’s Fireweed Books (which is a terrific bookstore – especially the magazine section) and bought multiple copies of your new book: Wild Rivers of the Yukon’s Peel Watershed.”

 

Brian Brett, poet, novelist and journalist, Salt Spring Island, BC

 

“I got the book, and it’s wonderful. Dense and alluring. My heart just went out to be back on the river. I still dream of returning. I feel privileged to be in the new version.”

 

See also the blog comments posted earlier.